(03/22/2015) The Agony of Death?

Posted: March 21, 2015 in Commitment, Covenant, Death, Faith and Works, Salvation, Sin
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Today, additional points are shared (below) on Christ accepting death on the cross, and refusing gall mixed with wine.  Through the ministry of Jesus Christ, mankind is no longer challenged to accomplish salvation with victory over death, pride, and sin having only the finite tools of emotion, muscle, and thought.  A fighter at thoughts.com using the ID “GoldenPig2012” commented on  (03/20/2015) Gall Refused on the Cross? posing the following question:

 

So, what are you saying? We humans should or should not refuse pain relieving medicine?

 

THE BATTLE AXE:  Gall Refused on the Cross? (03/20/2015)—(5.)  The death of Jesus of Nazareth by crucifixion has to be understood as both a natural (we say, human, in the flesh, physical) and sacred event (we say, divine, in the spirit, miraculous, spiritual). 

(6.) Christians also acknowledge divine diversity revealed through various devices for managing and ending physical pain. Included are acupuncture, amputation, cold and heat, drugs (that block and force change in regular body functions), exercise, faith, herbs (that assist and unblock regular body functions), meditation, rest, and death.

(7.)  In the same way human use of anesthesia and pain-killers in surgery and medicine is different by purpose from use of the noose, electric chair and lethal injections, the suffering of Christ upon the cross is different by sacred operations, eternal purpose, and divine substance from that of the two thieves executed at that same time and place.

(8.)  All carnal creatures upon the earth now must complete or “pass through” the condition of mortality—we say, must die, or be made immortal and incorruptible (transformed) at the Second Coming of Christ in glory.  While angels are not immortal, they are not mortal, and do not “die”.  For humans, the agony of death is experienced on multiple levels all at the same time.  For death is emotional, material, mental, physical, psychological, and spiritual.  In addition to pain there may be anger, anxiety, bereavement (loss, separation), bitterness, condemnation, despair, disgrace, doubt, fear (we say, torment), feeling betrayed, grief, humiliation (we say, shame), impotence, regret and sorrow.

(9.)  The sting (we might say, barb or hook) of death is sin.  The barb enters a person smoothly, without effort, and attaches to establish a fixed bond.  When attempts are made to reject and retract the connection to death, the hook grips and holds more tenaciously; and the more one struggles against it, the more their flesh is damaged and torn.  So to speak, the more violently the victim thrashes about and resists the pull of death, the more they lose strength, and are drained of their life’s blood.  Consider again 1st Corinthians 15:  54-56 King James Version (KJV):  54 So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory.  55 O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?  56 The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law.

There is far more to be plainly said, correctly understood, and to get a proper grip upon.  (For example, (10.)  Jesus Christ demonstrated the higher possibilities (e.g., cleansing, forgiveness, healing, inheritance) for human life upon the earth through covenant with divinity.  Because the Lord endured the agony of death on behalf of all mankind, the completion of mortality for his chosen now signals new access to Deity through resurrection that will seal the righteous in eternal life, and allow completion of divine judgment against the wicked.  Men are to live in continuous acknowledgment of GOD, not to exist in permanent darkness, then die.)  Even so, I trust this fragment will be useful.  Be it unto you according to your faith.

THE BLACK PHOENIX
Washington, DC

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