(11/22/2018) Forgiven Yet Not Reconciled?

Posted: November 22, 2018 in Betrayal, Cain, Christian Beliefs, David, Divine Grace, Forgiveness, Inheritance, Judgment, Mercy, Reconciliation
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david-mourning-absalom-dore

The print by Gustave Dore depicts David mourning his son Absalom

 

Today, points are shared on the account of King David allowing his son Absalom to return home from exile, and the matter of divine forgiveness unaccompanied by reconciliation. The full gravity of a person’s offenses against GOD may not be discerned immediately; and a crime having serious spiritual consequences and outcomes may be shown less attention than a sin against mankind that is carnal such as fratricide. Because godly and righteous judgment require forgiveness, impartiality, and mercy be shown to transgressors (sinners), where parents and other family are charged to put aside and suppress feelings of love or obligation to serve as judge, they also will distance themselves to establish and maintain balance, integrity, and soundness for the process of law. In response, those who receive the benefits of judgment are to acknowledge what they have received through their regular displays of discretion, gratitude, repentance, reverence, and reconciliation, rather than ambition, irreverence, politics, or self-promotion. A fighter in the “Yahoo! Answers” public forum on Religion and Spirituality, who uses the ID “She Dances With Love” (Level 7 with 59,145 points, a member since August 27, 2007) posted the following:

 

Why isn’t Absalom pardoned?

The king said, “Let him dwell apart in his own house; he is not to come into my presence.” So Absalom lived apart in his own house and did not come into the king’s presence.

(2 Samuel 14:24)

David shows mercy to Absalom. He does not enforce the penalty of the law that condemned his son. But Absalom is not pardoned. Why?

There is no reconciliation. Why? What was missing?

Romans 3:25 speaks about what God did for his people until the coming of Jesus Christ into the world: “in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins.” God left the matter of justice for another time. Is there a connection to us in the story of David and Absalom?

That is what God had done with regard to David’s sin, and that is what David did with regard to Absalom; he “passed over former sins.”

 

THE GOLDEN ARROW: And it came to pass after this, that Absalom prepared him chariots and horses, and fifty men to run before him. And Absalom rose up early, and stood beside the way of the gate: and it was so, that when any man that had a controversy came to the king for judgment, then Absalom called unto him, and said, Of what city art thou? And he said, Thy servant is of one of the tribes of Israel. And Absalom said unto him, See, thy matters are good and right; but there is no man deputed of the king to hear thee. Absalom said moreover, Oh that I were made judge in the land, that every man which hath any suit or cause might come unto me, and I would do him justice! And it was so, that when any man came nigh to him to do him obeisance, he put forth his hand, and took him, and kissed him. And on this manner did Absalom to all Israel that came to the king for judgment: so Absalom stole the hearts of the men of Israel. (2nd Samuel 15: 1-6, King James Version, KJV)

 

THE DOUBLE DAGGER: A Descendent of David? (03/18/2018); The Operations of Sin (07/25/2017); Reconciliation Provided By Christ (05/30/2017); Carrying Out Divine Law? (03/20/2017); Restoring the Divine Presence? (03/09/2017); The Death Penalty? (10/08/2015); Why So Much Murder? (01/12/2013); Confusion 2013 (01/13/2013)

 

She Dances With Love”, here are some points Christian believers may consider to further apprehend mankind’s inheritance from divinity and the figures of David and his son, Absalom:

1. While fratricide by Cain, the son of Adam, was a terrible transgression and violation of divine law, Cain also transgressed by dishonoring his father and mother, Adam and Eve. More than this, Cain despised and rejected his inheritance of divine priesthood with its sacred operations for atonement, judgment, offering, sacrifice, and salvation for the earth that was modeled after the divine priesthood within the temple in heaven.

2. While GOD set a mark and seal upon Cain for the defense and protection (we say, deliverance; salvation) of one who committed murder, and Cain goes on to live a life of repentance, Cain is not to be seen pleading for or acknowledging divine forgiveness; thus, reconciliation does not appear so much as the divine bestowal of mercy that is revealed and made visible primarily through judgment. It is Seth, the son of Adam, who appears as the chosen heir to the priesthood, and who prefigures the ministry of Jesus Christ on the earth.

3. While Absalom also was guilty of killing his own brother, his transgression attacked the dynasty bestowed to David through divine promise. Absalom denied and despised the divine anointing of David as the monarch (chief; king) over Israel, his own accountability as an heir to the throne of David (not that of his grandfather), and the duty of his father David to deliver justice and serve as the chosen spokesperson (we say, prophet) from GOD to administer and proclaim divine law.

There is far more that should be said, correctly examined, and spiritually apprehended. (For example, 4. Absalom as the son of King David is most a figure of Jesus Christ when he is ordered to be killed by Joab (the commander of the army, and nephew of the king). The hair on his head became entangled in the branches and limbs of a tree, and Absalom was plucked from his mount, and suspended in the air. The betrayal by Judas is depicted, and the rejection of Christ by the elders of Israel.) Even so, I trust this fragment will be useful. Be it unto you according to your faith.

Signature Mark

THE BLACK PHOENIX

Washington, DC

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