Faith and Works

 

Today, reply is on giving while in the workplace. Giving without integrity is dead. Correctly practiced, giving for Christian believers always will be marked by such elements as balance, accountability, cheerfulness, dutifulness, gratitude, humility, impartiality, lovingkindness, peace of mind, respect, and restraint. One of the fighters in the “Yahoo! Answers” public forum on Religion and Spirituality who uses the ID “Anonymous” (no profile is shared) posted the following:

 

Do you think it was wrong for my manager not to give the homeless man a meal?

A while ago a homeless guy stopped by the fast food place I worked at and asked for a meal. My manager said no and gave him the excuse that there are cameras watching our every move and he could get in trouble for giving away a meal.

All of the employees were talking about how he should’ve given the man some food because people still get away with doing things even though the cameras are watching. My manager told me that lately the management team has been getting in trouble for giving away too many free meals and he was afraid if getting in trouble.

I for one kind of agree with him. As an employee I don’t even get a free meal and I bend over backwards for this establishment. I don’t see why some random person off the street should get free food for doing nothing. He can take advantage of the local soup kitchen.

 

THE GOLDEN ARROW: Yea, a man may say, Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without thy works, and I will shew thee my faith by my works. Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble. (James 2: 18-19, King James Version, KJV)

 

THE DOUBLE DAGGER: The Use of Money? (01/07/2019); Commitment To The Brand? (06/07/2018); Giving, A Divine Discipline? (10/09/2017); The Answer From GOD (05/19/2017); It Comes With the Job? (01/11/2015); Religious Bosses? (07/08/2014); On Marketing Church, and Speaking by Occasion (09/26/2013); A Lid on Love? (09/27/2013)

 

Anonymous”, there are correct and wrong places, times and ways of displaying ones faith, applying truth from the Bible, and of giving to the poor. Managers in the hospitality industry and those they supervise must discharge a broad range of duties regarding the inventory, the reputation of their firm, and the materials used to present their goods to the public for income. Without a full payment for the goods, a report of pilfering (petty theft by an employee; violation of the contract and job description) should be filed, rather than a report of charitable giving. Those who want to use the organization they work for to provide gifts and support to others should use the opportunities, policies and programs of their firm intended to express goodwill and support to the community-at-large. Where the manager, or a worker wanted to share with an individual homeless person who came into their store, they would have had to deposit payment from their own wallet into the corporate cash register, or surrender the meal(s) they were to receive as an employee (e.g., breakfast/dinner/lunch).

For most of us, the workplace is not a setting for the full expression of our spiritual beliefs; there is an unwritten accord that preaching, proselytizing, or religious ceremonies, practices and rites are not to be carried out in the workplace. Developing Christian believers are in a relationship with divinity where all they possess, all they share, and much of what they do is directed primarily to GOD for the fulfillment of sacred commitment, eternal purpose, and expressing the sovereign will of GOD. In a similar way, believers are encouraged to acknowledge their employers as covenant partners with whom they are bound through personal accountability, legal agreements, ethical process, promises, and shared financial interests. Sinners who become “born again” are cautioned to avoid taking on the task of judging others, particularly with regard to giving, service, and worship. In addition to the risk of “jumping to conclusions,” those who judge encounter many subtleties (i.e., barely visible differences; hidden shifts in meaning, quality and value) that must be assigned weight, and correctly examined for their influence and outcome.

Various unexpected events (e.g., transportation accidents, fires, flooding, mudslides, snow) may result in multiple deaths, and urgent demands for funding, gifts, medical supplies, and other support. Properly performed, giving to the church allows sharing through multiple carefully managed programs and mechanisms for distributing resources. Such giving should be regular and reliable; and, in the same way one disciplines, plans and uses restraint for their spending, giving also is best accomplished using a budget, formal order, and restraint. Here are further points believers reflect on that use language from the Bible:

1. Proverbs 16: 25, King James Version (KJV): 25 There is a way that seemeth right unto a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death.

2. Proverbs 20: 11, KJV: 11 Even a child is known by his doings, whether his work be pure, and whether it be right.

3. Proverbs 19: 17, KJV: 19 He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto the LORD; and that which he hath given will he pay him again.

4. Proverbs 14: 31, KJV: 31 He that oppresseth the poor reproacheth his Maker: but he that honoureth him hath mercy on the poor.

There is far more that should be said, correctly examined, and spiritually apprehended. (For example, 5. Proverbs 22: 1-2, KJV: 22 A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches, and loving favour rather than silver and gold. 2 The rich and poor meet together: the LORD is the maker of them all.) Even so, I trust this fragment will be useful. Be it unto you according to your faith.

Signature Mark

THE BLACK PHOENIX

Washington, DC

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